Ensure you only pay for the material you receive

Variations from initial material volume estimates and final in-place volumes often occur, resulting in cost overruns, construction claims, disputes, budget waste and added administrative costs.

With a Loadscan LVS system you’ll end supply disputes. If you purchase or supply construction materials in cubic volume then it makes sense to manage and account for infill delivered to site using a common method, because disputes over supply can be frustrating, time consuming and expensive.

Traditional methods of determining truck load volumes, including converting from weight, counting loader buckets, or simply counting trucks, are inaccurate and contribute to supply disputes. Survey quantities don’t account for bulking factors in material loaded into a truck from a cut, nor compaction of the material when it’s unloaded at a fill site.

Volumetric laser scanning is the only accurate and consistent method for measuring truck loads.

Underloading costs civil operators a fortune

Underloaded trucks can significantly increase overall project costs, and it’s not uncommon to see underloading factors as high as 20%.

With automatically generated 3D scans of every load you can identify poor loading practices and use the information to coach and train loader operators.

By optimising loading you’ll maximise the value of every contract. In addition, knowing that you’re accurately measuring and optimising your truck capacity will enable you to be more confident when preparing project bids.

Optimally Loaded: 14.1yd³ payload = 46,100 truck loads

Underloaded: 11.9yd³ payload = 54,622 truck loads

The following load performance scatterplots illustrate how one customer improved loading with the implementation of the LVS system.

Load Volume — Stated vs Measured
Load Volume - Stated vs Measured

Customer-stated volumes were over-reported by 24.2% when measured against actual load volumes scanned with the Loadscan LVS.

Load Volume — Pre vs Post LVS
Load Volume – Pre vs Post LVS

After implementing the Loadscan LVS, actual loaded volumes increased by 18.5%. The scan data enabled operator training and coaching to be carried out, improving loading practices.

Underloading requires 8,522 additional truck loads to shift 500,000yd³

Inaccurate bulking and compaction factors can add significant costs to projects.

Inaccurate bulking and compaction factors can add significant costs to projects.

Managing multiple contractors can be a real headache for civil operators!

Managing multiple contractors can be a headache!

Managing haulback is important to improving your project profitability.

Managing haulback to improve project profitability

Volume scanning delivers extensive benefits for civil operators

  • Measure actual volumes, not estimates based on inaccurate conversion factors — reduces potential for human error

  • Proven accurate to +/- 1% (Certified for Trade in New Zealand and Australia)

  • Ensure you only pay for the material you receive

  • Improve project delivery by accurately accounting for bulking and compaction factors

  • Optimise truck loading for maximum asset utilisation

  • Easily manage multiple contractors using the RFID tag system installed on trucks

  • Track every load delivered or removed from site by automatically capturing truck arrival and departure times

  • Eliminate hand-written load dockets and manual docket processing by automatically printing them for drivers or truck operators

  • Easily access historical period reporting for invoicing, site survey reconciliation and performance analysis, onsite or with remote off-site access

  • No significant maintenance costs or recalibration required

How the LVS system works

Empty truck is scanned to create reference scan in the database

Trucks are scanned by driving below an elevated scan head, which can be mounted on a portable or fixed pole or can be fitted to a trailer. The scanning process is fully automated

Trucks can be tracked manually or fitted with RFID tags for automatic identification

Proprietary Overview software reports volumetric measurement, including 3D load profiles of every load

How the LVS system works

Empty truck is scanned to create reference scan in the database

Trucks can be tracked manually or fitted with RFID tags for automatic identification

Trucks are scanned by driving below an elevated scan head, which can be mounted on a portable or fixed pole or can be fitted to a trailer. The scanning process is fully automated

Proprietary Overview software reports volumetric measurement, including 3D load profiles of every load

A typical civil construction load scanning system

Typical LVS system

System visual is indicative only and not to scale. Final system specification may vary.

See how other civil construction businesses are using Loadscan load volume scanners.

Loadscan’s load volume scanners are being used successfully by civil operators across the globe.
Click on the case studies to see how these Loadscan customers are benefiting from volumetric scanning…

Easy to set up, easy to use, easy to shift.
Improving costing and pricing for tendering for jobs big and small
Loadscan reveals that quantities received and delivered are way off
Improving trucking factors and solving disputes in Switzerland
Solving civil construction discrepancies in Russia’s extreme conditions
Leveraging automated measurement across multiple sites
Load volume scanner not wasting a metre
Scanning for heavy vehicle safety

Our trucks have shorter stops as you can lose time during conventional measurement. There is also little effort in checking the delivered quantities at our disposal site. We are very satisfied with the ease of use.

– Bruno Kohler, Banholzer Bau AG, Switzerland

At A&R Earthmovers the Loadscan scanner is used for a range of things such as: measuring imported metal that is being used to build our roads, measuring fill that is carted around site, and selling pumice and our other products out the gate.

– Cassidy Schulz, A&R Earthmovers, NZ

Would you like the same benefits that other civil operators have enjoyed?